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Northern Gas Pipelines is your public service 1-stop-shop for Alaska and Canadian Arctic energy commentary, news, history, projects and people. It is informal and rich with new information, updated daily. Here is the most timely and complete Arctic gas pipeline and northern energy archive available anywhere—used by media, academia, government and industry officials throughout the world. Northern Gas Pipelines may be the oldest Alaska blog; we invite readers to suggest others existing before 2001.

 

AGDC

9-24-14

24 September 2014 4:58am

 
Midstream startup building first gas plant
Calgary Herald, By Dan Healing... to remove condensate from its liquids-rich gas so it qualifies for transport in a dry gas pipeline.
 
 
 
TransCanada work on St. Lawrence port suspended by Quebec court order
CBC.ca, The TransCanada Energy East pipeline project includes converting an existing naturalgas pipeline to an oil transportation pipeline. This project is ...

Petroleum News by Kristen Nelson.  

Three projects are under way to deliver North Slope natural gas to Alaskans - and on three different scales and timelines.

Cathy Giessel, Alaska Oil & Gas Congress, Alaska, Senator, Natural Resources, Gas Pipeline, ACES, AGIA, Photo by Dave HarbourPersonal note: While our duties found us out of State last week, we were honored to have been named Chairman Emeritus of the Alaska Oil & Gas Congress.  

Bill Popp, Anchorage Economic Development Corporation, Alaska Oil & Gas Congress, Natural Resources, Gas Pipeline, ACES, AGIA, Photo by Dave HarbourWe have enjoyed our association with CI Energy Group and other conference organizers for over a decade, chairing conferences from Houston to Anchorage and from Edmonton and Calgary to Inuvik.

Last week we were particularly pleased to note the outstanding leadership of Alaska State Senator Cathy Giessel (NGP Photo) and Anchorage Economic Development Corporation President Bill Popp (NGP Photo), both highly qualified for their Co-Chair assignments.

Lastly, we commend CI Energy Group for its support of the community, via memberships in the Alaska and Anchorage Chambers of Commerce, the Resource Development Council for Alaska and the Alaska Support industry Alliance.  

Those groups also sponsor outstanding natural resource and energy forums, but CI has the only 3-4 day forum that provides in depth coverage and presentations to an audience that represents energy companies and users from throughout the Pacific Rim.

-dh

The 10th annual Alaska Oil & Gas Congress got an update on all three in Anchorage Sept. 16.

The smallest, and furthest along, would truck liquefied natural gas from the North Slope to Fairbanks, adding to the small amount of Cook Inlet LNG currently being trucked to Fairbanks.

The other projects....(More here....  We recommend our readers subscribe to PNA for in depth O&G reporting, Alaska and Canada.  -dh)


TODAY'S CONSUMER ENERGY ALLIANCE ENERGY LINKS:

Shale Reporter: Abundance of opportunities await schools in wake of energy revolution*Mike Butler Op-Ed
Schools saved more than $45.5 million in 2013, according to a recent study by IHS Global Insight, enough to employ more than 480 teachers. Pennsylvania public schools saved about 8.3% on electricity costs and 22.1% on natural gas. There’s more: The analysis said taxpayers saved another $19 million in government-related spending, or enough to employ 280 governmental workers. That’s tremendous news for communities and districts still tussling with the lingering effects of the Great Recession.
 
Downstream Today: OPINION: Railing Against Keystone XL, Willie and Neil Are Hurting Farmers *Michael Whatley Quoted

Two celebrity singers known for supporting America’s farmers will perform at a pipeline protest in Nebraska on Saturday despite the outcome of their advocacy damaging the livelihood of farmers throughout the Midwest.
 
Associated Press: US gas prices fall to lowest since February, Lundberg says.
Refiners are taking advantage of booming oil production from U.S. shale formations that’s expected to increase domestic crude output in 2015 to the most in 45 years. The surge in production has kept WTI prices below international benchmark North Sea Brent every day since August 2010.
 
The Hill: Report: Natural gas exports could hurt Russian state-owned company.
Increasing exports of liquefied natural gas from the United States could reduce revenue at Russia’s state-owned gas company by 18 percent, according to a new report. The report, released Monday by Columbia University’s Center on Global Energy Policy, found that increased competition from the United States could hurt Gazprom and lower European natural gas prices.
 
Washington Post: Shale in North Dakota: Women in the drilling boomtowns.
Fracking has brought in an influx of oil workers—many of them women—from across the country attracted to the high salaries and burgeoning housing market created to accommodate the surge in residents. The result is the town’s population has nearly doubled in the past 10 years.
 
Star Tribune: Keystone XL operator seeks South Dakota approval
The operator of the long-delayed Keystone XL crude oil pipeline on Monday formally asked South Dakota's utility regulators to recertify the portion of the project that runs through the state.
 
Townhall: A good way to play the Keystone Pipeline Debate
The Greenbrier Companies (GBX) manufactures rail cars. The company was founded back in 1974 and is headquartered in Lake Oswego, Oregon. It may not be Alibaba (BABA), but rail car makers are doing pretty well these days thanks to the strong demand driven by the domestic energy boom and an ever-improving economy.
 
Michigan Radio: Enbridge completes work on final stretch of replacement oil pipeline
 
The Coloradoan: Oil and gas task force plans first meeting
Gov. John Hickenlooper’s oil and gas commission will have its first meeting on Thursday, Sept. 25, when the 19-member task force will plan for the next six months and five more meetings. The 19 appointees have six hours for their agenda on Thursday, which will be followed by a two-hour window for public comment, said Sara Barwinski, one of the task force’s members. From September to February, the commission will host six public meetings throughout the state.
 
The Coloradoan: Council to vote on appealing HF ruling
One month after a Larimer County judge overturned Fort Collins’ five-year moratorium on hydraulic fracturing, the City Council is considering whether to appeal that decision. Fort Collins City Council will vote Tuesday, Sept. 23 on a resolution that would direct the interim city attorney to file an appeal of the decision, which overturned the citizen-initiated ordinance voters passed in November 2013.
 
Fayetteville Observer: HF is safe, but are well casings?
We need rigorous guidelines for those well casings and the joints that seal them. And we also will need to have enough well-trained inspectors in the field. Fracking may not pollute, but the wells can - and for a public or private water supply, the source of pollution isn't the issue. Preventing it is.
 
WRAL: Natural gas pipeline concerns some in Nashville
When it comes to a proposed natural gas pipeline through eastern North Carolina, Ronald Bunn sees its path as more than a line through a map. Bunn was at a public meeting in Nashville Monday night to question a plan by Duke Energy and Virginia-based Dominion Resources to build the $5 billion pipeline, which would run parallel to Interstate 95.
 
Newsmax: North Dakota Tops US Income Gains Thanks to Bakken
North Dakota leads the nation in personal income growth. No other state even comes close. From 2008 to 2012, North Dakotans' per-capita income jumped 31 percent, according to the U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis.
 
Pittsburgh Post-Gazette: A day in the life of a longtime DEP inspector
Mr. Sengle, 56, has been working for the past four years in the Clearfield County area with the DEP’s oil and gas division working on natural gas sites, including Marcellus Shale well sites. “My experience for the most part is the companies have been pretty attentive,” he said of the natural gas companies he inspects now.
 
York Dispatch: Corbett, Wolf clash in Hershey debate
Wolf also said he'd like to see the gas industry drilling in the Marcellus Shale deposits in the state charged a 5 percent severance tax. That, he said, would generate an added $1 billion for the state, which could be used for education or other needs. "I'm not trying to kill the goose that lays the golden egg. Let's share that gold with the people of Pennsylvania," Wolf said.
 
Columbus Business First: Production outpacing pipeline regulation, GAO says
Oil and gas production is outpacing both pipeline construction and regulation, and the U.S. Department of Transportation needs to consider making new rules, a federal agency saidMonday. “While the Department of Transportation has worked to identify and address risks, its regulation has not kept pace with the changing oil and gas transportation environment,” the U.S. Government Accountability Office said in its report on oil and gas infrastructure, including pipelines, rail and trucks.
 
State Impact Texas: Oil & Gas Trouble In Texas Ranchland: Whose Road Is It?
The Railroad Commission of Texas will meet Monday morning to consider an issue of huge importance to landowners across Texas. It has to do with how the state oversees energy companies that need access to private land. At issue at the hearing will be pipelines for oil & gas.
 
Chico Enterprise News: State Assembly, Senate candidates face off at Chico forum
While Jawahar was opposed to fracking, calling it a "dirty technology" that uses too much of the state's limited water resource, Nielsen said it is a safe method to develop needed energy resources and that it would be "foolhardy" not to use it. They also conflicted on climate change, with Jawahar saying it's real and that it needs to be addressed and Nielsen saying global warming is a natural process of the planet.

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9-13-14

13 September 2014 4:58pm

AGDC Chair to speak at Chamber Luncheon ~ Sep 18Delta News Web, John Burns, Chairman of the Board of the Alaska Gasline Development Corporation (AGDC) will be the guest speaker at the September Chamber of ...

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Alaska Gas Project Moves Foreward

12 September 2014 5:04pm

Journal of Commerce by Tim Bradner.  Step by step, the Alaska LNG Project is moving forward. The project made a big advance Sept. 5 with its application to the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission to begin a pre-filing process for the project. 

Earlier this summer an application was submitted to the U.S. Department of Energy for a license to export liquefied natural gas, or LNG. Pre-Front End Engineering and Design work, or pre-FEED, which will cost about half a billion dollars, also got underway this summer.

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8-7-14 NIMBY and "palpable tensions" among stakeholders

07 August 2014 4:46am

A Fairbanks columnist (i.e. below) admits a conflict of interest -- then opposes a pipeline gravel site possibly needed for a gas pipeline that could lower Fairbanks consumer energy costs.  

It is a classic example of NIMBY, "Not In My Back Yard".  We do not suggest it is improper for a columnist to pen commentary.  Neither do we proclaim NIMBY to be a 'bad' thing.  We do suggest NIMBY is a reality upon which pipeline 'stakeholder relations' professionals must concentrate.  

There is a palpable tension among various special interests: affected neighbors, consumers-at-large, pipeline engineers, local and state politicians and the ticking clock which calculates rising costs of delay just as surely as it tells the time.  -dh

Fairbanks News Miner by Kris Capps.  Two areas in the borough are being considered as possible material sites, or gravel pits, for an in-state gas pipeline, and the Denali Borough wants to know what residents think about it.  ...  In the interest of full disclosure, readers should know this is my neighborhood, and I own a home on Karma Ridge.  ... The thought of our one-lane neighborhood road becoming a major route for truckloads of materials causes me great concern.


Doc Hastings, Natural Resources Committee, EPA Overreach, Dave Harbour PhotoYesterday, Natural Resources Committee Chairman Doc Hastings (NGP Photo) sent a letter to the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers voicing strong concerns over the Corps’ settlement this week with Columbia Riverkeeper, a group that for years has sued the federal government and favors removal of Northwest dams. The settlement, which involves payment of over $140,000 in taxpayer-funded attorneys’ fees to the plaintiff, would vastly expand the regulatory authority of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) over Army Corps’ dam operations nationwide. These dams, especially those in the Pacific Northwest, are the major source of clean, renewable electricity, irrigation, flood control, and navigation.

“Incredibly, I understand that no one other than U.S. Department of Justice or Army Corps lawyers were made aware of the terms of this sweeping settlement before it was finalized, and signed by a judge.  Like an increasing number of the Obama Administration’s ‘sue and settle’ agreements over the past few years, this settlement was negotiated behind closed-doors by the Justice Department with a litigious group without consultation or input from those most directly impacted,” wrote Chairman Hastings in the letter. Of great concern is the likely precedent that this decision could have relating to the EPA’s enforcement of the Clean Water Act, relating to the operation and maintenance of federal and non-federal dams, irrigation and maintenance of a vital navigational link on the Columbia and Snake Rivers in Washington, Idaho and Oregon. This comes amidst the EPA’s hugely controversial ‘Waters of the U.S.’ proposal, which could shut down a host of water development projects and make it easier for litigious groups to sue to block them. I would request an immediate and thorough explanation of the Army Corps’ rationale and details of its actions relative to this settlement, not just to Congress, but also to all affected state, local tribal and other stakeholders that have an interest in the Army Corps’ dam operations nationwide.”

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7-11-14 Native Leaders Support SB 21 - Is Enbridge Alaska's Newest Pipeline Sweetheart?

11 July 2014 6:50am

Did You Read It Here First?  Last Night The Globe & Mail Posted News Involving A Relationship Between One of Canada's Greatest Pipeline Companies And The Alaska Gasline Development Corporation.


Globe & Mail by Shawn McCarthy.  

Enbridge Inc. is turning its eyes north to Alaska, entering talks with the state to build an $8-billion (U.S.) natural gas pipeline there if a competing project falters.

The Calgary energy company and the state-owned Alaska Gas Development Corp. (AGDC) “are undertaking substantive and exclusive discussion” which would see Enbridge become the builder and operator for the 1,163-kilometre pipeline. It would carry natural gas from the North Slope to Fairbanks and other communities in southern Alaska.

ADN Opinion Editorial, by Rex A. Rock Sr. (NGP Photo), Aaron Schutt, Sophie Minich, Helvi Sandvik, Jason Metrokin, Gail Schubert.  

Rex Rock, SB 21, ASRC, Alaska Native Corporation, Photo by Dave HarbourMany Alaskans may wonder why six of the largest Native corporations have united behind the effort to defeat Ballot Measure 1. Those who know little about us might assume it’s because some of the coalition members have business interests aligned with the oil industry. But that is too simple an answer. We did not enter into this conversation lightly.

As First Alaskans, our people have learned for generations to use and protect the resources that surround us. We have learned that to provide for future generations – for tomorrow’s children to have the same opportunities we enjoy – hard decisions must be made today.

We have listened carefully to the debate surrounding tax reform and weighed its benefits and drawbacks. We have also allowed ourselves the time to determine if the oil industry’s promises of increased investment were genuine. Some of our businesses are in the oil industry and some are not. What we have seen is an increase in investment into our oil industry, aimed at getting new oil in the pipeline. While that may be good for some of our businesses, it is good for all Alaskans. Our corporations collectively employ thousands of Alaskans and our employees support small Alaska businesses and the overall economy. New investments increase our opportunity to put new oil in the pipeline. Extending the life of our oil fields translates into continued contributions to our state treasury and the services the state provides to Alaskans for the long-term.

More....

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7-8-14 Fairbanks is 'gearing up' for a 'deluge of affordable, clean-burning natural gas'.

08 July 2014 7:35am

1350+ Peer-Reviewed Papers Supporting Skeptic Arguments Against ACC/AGW Alarmism


Fairbanks News Miner by Matt Buxton.  Utilities, state agencies and local leaders are gearing up for what they say will be a great deluge of affordable, clean-burning natural gas into the Fairbanks area.  Crews are busily installing service lines, utilities are boasting of grand plans for expansion, there are town halls on the subject and local politicians are patting themselves on the back.

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