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Northern Gas Pipelines is your public service 1-stop-shop for Alaska and Canadian Arctic energy commentary, news, history, projects and people. It is informal and rich with new information, updated daily. Here is the most timely and complete Arctic gas pipeline and northern energy archive available anywhere—used by media, academia, government and industry officials throughout the world. Northern Gas Pipelines may be the oldest Alaska blog; we invite readers to suggest others existing before 2001.

 

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10-14-14 Dandelions and Energy - National Poll Supports Offshore Oil & Gas

14 October 2014 6:07am

National Poll Supports OCS O&G 

Today's Commentary: Energy, Daisies, Dandelions, Poppies and Bureaucracies

Janet Weiss, BP Alaska, Oklahoma State University, Hall of Fame, Dave Harbour PhotoThe College of Engineering, Architecture and Technology at Oklahoma State University inducted five industry leaders into its Hall of Fame last Saturday including 1986 Chemical Engineering graduate,  Janet Weiss (NGP Photo) now President of BP Alaska.

More....

CEA POLL SHOWS MAJORITY SUPPORT IN KEY STATES FOR OFFSHORE DRILLING: 

Consumer Energy Alliance voter polls conducted in three states with pivotal U.S. Senate races finds strong support for allowing oil and natural gas drilling in U.S. waters inside the Arctic Circle. The poll finds Alaska, Georgia and Louisiana each have  close races for U.S. Senate that will indicate the direction of federal policy towards offshore energy.  More.... 

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Also...see our recent commentary on the effect of the Senate races on Alaska energy policy.  -dh

 


How Government Deals With One Invasive Species, The Dandelion

by

Dave Harbour

(Point of personal privilege)

Dandelions, invasive specie, public monies, bureaucratic bungling, wasted tax dollars, Photo by Dave Harbouro, Federal Highway Dollars, public landscapes, poor maintenanceThis is, admittedly, a pet peeve.  The only way I could relate the dandelion invasion to our study of energy, is to make a point that bureaucracies will never be as efficient with public dollars as citizens are with family dollars.  

invasive species, dandelion, daisies, poppies, public rights of way, landscaping, bureaucratic bungling, Photo by Dave HarbourAs a homeowner, I go out and dig up every new dandelion.  My wife plants a wonderful array of floribunda alaskana every spring.  Church volunteers cull dandelions and cultivate daisies.  

But government cultivates dandelions and kills desirable species while simultaneously holding 'Invasive Species Workshops'.  

This morning I provided a comment to Alaska Business Monthly regarding an upcoming 'Invasive Species Workshop' listed on its Industry News page.  I don't know if the organizers will make a dent in the invasion of unwanted species next year.  They do justify spending public money on workshops and publications and 'public outreach' -- which incrementally increases the demand for higher taxes.  So, hopefully, the effort will produce cost-effective results.

Meanwhile, with a little common sense, at no additional cost and without workshops government planners could significantly slow the spread of one invasive species, the dandelion.

In our primary area of interest and expertise, energy, one notes that with North Dakota oil and gas production being on mostly private property, it flourishes (Also note Texas, Pennsylvania, Ohio, etc.).  But in federal areas, bureaucracies stop production before it begins while cultivating their own, invasive bureaucratic growth.  For example, observe the gold plated offices, in Anchorage, inhabited by Department of Interior agencies along with their hundreds of employees, including huge public relations staffs.  And, what is their demonstrated, primary role: stopping human activity in a state whose Constitution requires development of natural resources.

The invasive dandelions of government are protected while entrepreneurial daisies and poppies are cut down and eventually culled out of existence.

To continue this little allegory, below we reprint for your information and, perhaps, entertainment, "A Dandelion Story", slightly modified for our readers.

P.S.  If Invasive Species Workshop participants do make a dent this coming year in stopping or slowing the growth of invasive species -- particularly the dandelion invasion -- we will look forward to receiving information from them and including it in our searchable archives.  We know these public employees are well intended and we look forward to hearing about their results. 


Commentary for readers: Alaska Business Monthly (as modified)

A government-sponsored "Invasive Species Workshop" will occur October 28-30 in Anchorage (www.alaskainvasives.org).

Anchorage School District Headquarters, Cultivate Invasive Specie, Dandelion, Dave Harbour Photo, ASDGovernment agencies have generally ignored the invasive species 'elephant in the room', the ubiquitous dandelion.

From public rights of way, dandelion seeds attack neighborhood lawns and establish beach heads throughout our wilderness.

We plant daisies and poppies in the rights of way to meet beautification / landscaping / environmental standards for federal dollars. But the folks who make the plans don't maintain the projects.

Then, dandelions invade. The dandelions are first to pop up in May and early June. Smart maintenance managers could mow then, before yellow dandelion flowers go to seed and before delicate poppy and daisy heads pop up.

But no. Maintenance managers allow the dandelions to flower then go to seed, just as the wonderful poppies and daisies are coming up in mid to late June. The street/highway maintenance managers then send out the lawn mowers to cut down the dandelions just as they are going to seed, spreading the invasive seed, while simultaneously cutting off the heads of daisies and poppies before they can develop seeds.

Most summers there is a bumper crop of dandelions in August. Simultaneously, a few remaining daisies and poppies try again to propagate--just in time for the 2nd mowing.

At the forest edge of East Northern Lights Blvd. in Anchorage, where mowing does not occur, the daisies flourish and dandelions are sparse.

East High School, Cultivate Invasive Specie, Dandelion, Dave Harbour Photo, ASD

Where the miscoordinated mowing occurs, the expensively planted daisies and poppies die off for lack of progeny while the invasive dandelions multiply with help from street/highway maintenance managers.  

​Other government agencies also cultivate the invasive species in this way.  The Anchorage School District, with its own thoughtless mowing practices, is a major cultivator of invasive dandelions whose seeds invade nearby neighborhoods throughout the city.

Invasive specie, Alaska, Dandelion, street maintenance, Dave Harbour Photo

It seems that an "Invasive Species Workshop" goal should be to "pick the low-hanging invasive fruit". By simply changing the mowing schedules, maintenance managers could cheaply and efficiently accomplish two goals:

1.  They could restrain the propagation of the most invasive of plant species, while

2.  simultaneously protecting taxpayer landscape investments intended to beautify public rights of way and other government properties.

Respectfully,

Dave Harbour

Ref: http://tinyurl.com/mktjs5v, http://tinyurl.com/qbpuhve, http://tinyurl.com/k7ubpdg 


 

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(STILLWATER, Okla., October 13, 2014) – The College of Engineering, Architecture and Technology at Oklahoma State University inducted five industry leaders into its Hall of Fame on Saturday, Oct. 11. More than 250 people were present at the ConocoPhillips Alumni Center to recognize the achievements of those extraordinary individuals.

Hall of Fame inductees included Debbie Adams (’83 Chemical Engineering), Harold Courson (‘52-‘55 Engineering), Jeff Hume (‘75 Petroleum Engineering Technology), David Timberlake (‘65 Architectural Engineering) and Janet Weiss (‘86 Chemical Engineering).

These distinguished professionals were honored by OSU for their exceptional leadership and contributions to advancing the fields of engineering, architecture and technology.

Debbie Adams currently serves as the Senior Vice President of Phillips 66 based in Houston, Texas. After graduating from OSU with her chemical engineering degree in 1983, she began her career in oil and gas as a process engineer with Conoco. She worked in several capacities for the company, including roles that took her to Sweden and England after the 2002 merger that created ConocoPhillips. During the most recent transition that resulted in the formation of Phillips 66, Adams was named the President of Transportation and promoted to Senior Vice President. She currently serves on the Board of Trustees and Board of Governors for the OSU Foundation.

Harold Courson attended the engineering program at Oklahoma A&M from 1952-1955 before leaving to pursue the oil and gas drilling business. He purchased speculative gas leases in the Texas panhandle and founded Courson Oil and Gas in 1960. His company drilled two of the first horizontal wells in the early 1970s, one of which is still producing today. He has served three terms as Mayor of Perryton, Texas, and is currently the Chairman for Courson Oil and Gas, Inc. and Natural Gas Anadarko Company. Courson was one of 100 recognized as a History Maker of the High Plains by the Amarillo Globe-News.

Jeff Hume is a 1975 Petroleum Engineering Technology graduate who began his career prior to his time at OSU. Immediately following high school, Hume worked as a roustabout in the oil fields outside Enid. He soon realized his passion for the industry and came to Stillwater to obtain his degree. Since that time, he has been a leader for Continental Resources, Inc. for more than 30 years. Hume is a registered professional engineer and member of the Society of Petroleum Engineers. He is currently the Vice Chairman of Strategic Growth Initiatives for Continental Resources, Inc.

A 1965 Architectural Engineering graduate, David Timberlake received his degree and joined the Army Corps of Engineers before transitioning to the private sector. In Washington D.C., he worked in structural engineering and construction inspection for government buildings. There he met an influential colleague who led him on the path to founding his own company — Timberlake Construction. The company has built structures in 48 of the 50 states and its founder currently serves as Chairman and CEO.

Janet Weiss brought her love for math and science, especially chemistry, to OSU when she enrolled in the Chemical Engineering program. Her father, Dr. Franklin Leach, was a professor of biochemistry at OSU, so Janet grew up gaining a love for learning from her father and the university. She graduated in 1986 and began her career at ARCO, where she moved through the ranks. For the past 14 years, Weiss has worked for BP, and she has been a leader in the oil and gas industry. She currently serves as President of BP Alaska and is a published author on the Kuparuk River Field. Weiss is an active member of the Alaska Oil and Gas Association Board, University of Alaska Fairbanks Advisory Board and the Anchorage United Way Board.

Following Saturday’s ceremony, the College of Engineering, Architecture and Technology has recognized 101 Hall of Fame inductees.

For more information on the College of Engineering, Architecture and Technology at OSU, visitwww.ceat.okstate.edu 

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10-5-14 Personal: Another tribute to my Dad, Col. Dave Harbour

04 October 2014 10:01pm

Point of personal privilege.  Col. Dave Harbour continues to be remembered by Google, Amazon and this newest video, as we continue to love and miss him and Mom.  -dh

 

 

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9-24-14

24 September 2014 4:58am

 
Midstream startup building first gas plant
Calgary Herald, By Dan Healing... to remove condensate from its liquids-rich gas so it qualifies for transport in a dry gas pipeline.
 
 
 
TransCanada work on St. Lawrence port suspended by Quebec court order
CBC.ca, The TransCanada Energy East pipeline project includes converting an existing naturalgas pipeline to an oil transportation pipeline. This project is ...

Petroleum News by Kristen Nelson.  

Three projects are under way to deliver North Slope natural gas to Alaskans - and on three different scales and timelines.

Cathy Giessel, Alaska Oil & Gas Congress, Alaska, Senator, Natural Resources, Gas Pipeline, ACES, AGIA, Photo by Dave HarbourPersonal note: While our duties found us out of State last week, we were honored to have been named Chairman Emeritus of the Alaska Oil & Gas Congress.  

Bill Popp, Anchorage Economic Development Corporation, Alaska Oil & Gas Congress, Natural Resources, Gas Pipeline, ACES, AGIA, Photo by Dave HarbourWe have enjoyed our association with CI Energy Group and other conference organizers for over a decade, chairing conferences from Houston to Anchorage and from Edmonton and Calgary to Inuvik.

Last week we were particularly pleased to note the outstanding leadership of Alaska State Senator Cathy Giessel (NGP Photo) and Anchorage Economic Development Corporation President Bill Popp (NGP Photo), both highly qualified for their Co-Chair assignments.

Lastly, we commend CI Energy Group for its support of the community, via memberships in the Alaska and Anchorage Chambers of Commerce, the Resource Development Council for Alaska and the Alaska Support industry Alliance.  

Those groups also sponsor outstanding natural resource and energy forums, but CI has the only 3-4 day forum that provides in depth coverage and presentations to an audience that represents energy companies and users from throughout the Pacific Rim.

-dh

The 10th annual Alaska Oil & Gas Congress got an update on all three in Anchorage Sept. 16.

The smallest, and furthest along, would truck liquefied natural gas from the North Slope to Fairbanks, adding to the small amount of Cook Inlet LNG currently being trucked to Fairbanks.

The other projects....(More here....  We recommend our readers subscribe to PNA for in depth O&G reporting, Alaska and Canada.  -dh)


TODAY'S CONSUMER ENERGY ALLIANCE ENERGY LINKS:

Shale Reporter: Abundance of opportunities await schools in wake of energy revolution*Mike Butler Op-Ed
Schools saved more than $45.5 million in 2013, according to a recent study by IHS Global Insight, enough to employ more than 480 teachers. Pennsylvania public schools saved about 8.3% on electricity costs and 22.1% on natural gas. There’s more: The analysis said taxpayers saved another $19 million in government-related spending, or enough to employ 280 governmental workers. That’s tremendous news for communities and districts still tussling with the lingering effects of the Great Recession.
 
Downstream Today: OPINION: Railing Against Keystone XL, Willie and Neil Are Hurting Farmers *Michael Whatley Quoted

Two celebrity singers known for supporting America’s farmers will perform at a pipeline protest in Nebraska on Saturday despite the outcome of their advocacy damaging the livelihood of farmers throughout the Midwest.
 
Associated Press: US gas prices fall to lowest since February, Lundberg says.
Refiners are taking advantage of booming oil production from U.S. shale formations that’s expected to increase domestic crude output in 2015 to the most in 45 years. The surge in production has kept WTI prices below international benchmark North Sea Brent every day since August 2010.
 
The Hill: Report: Natural gas exports could hurt Russian state-owned company.
Increasing exports of liquefied natural gas from the United States could reduce revenue at Russia’s state-owned gas company by 18 percent, according to a new report. The report, released Monday by Columbia University’s Center on Global Energy Policy, found that increased competition from the United States could hurt Gazprom and lower European natural gas prices.
 
Washington Post: Shale in North Dakota: Women in the drilling boomtowns.
Fracking has brought in an influx of oil workers—many of them women—from across the country attracted to the high salaries and burgeoning housing market created to accommodate the surge in residents. The result is the town’s population has nearly doubled in the past 10 years.
 
Star Tribune: Keystone XL operator seeks South Dakota approval
The operator of the long-delayed Keystone XL crude oil pipeline on Monday formally asked South Dakota's utility regulators to recertify the portion of the project that runs through the state.
 
Townhall: A good way to play the Keystone Pipeline Debate
The Greenbrier Companies (GBX) manufactures rail cars. The company was founded back in 1974 and is headquartered in Lake Oswego, Oregon. It may not be Alibaba (BABA), but rail car makers are doing pretty well these days thanks to the strong demand driven by the domestic energy boom and an ever-improving economy.
 
Michigan Radio: Enbridge completes work on final stretch of replacement oil pipeline
 
The Coloradoan: Oil and gas task force plans first meeting
Gov. John Hickenlooper’s oil and gas commission will have its first meeting on Thursday, Sept. 25, when the 19-member task force will plan for the next six months and five more meetings. The 19 appointees have six hours for their agenda on Thursday, which will be followed by a two-hour window for public comment, said Sara Barwinski, one of the task force’s members. From September to February, the commission will host six public meetings throughout the state.
 
The Coloradoan: Council to vote on appealing HF ruling
One month after a Larimer County judge overturned Fort Collins’ five-year moratorium on hydraulic fracturing, the City Council is considering whether to appeal that decision. Fort Collins City Council will vote Tuesday, Sept. 23 on a resolution that would direct the interim city attorney to file an appeal of the decision, which overturned the citizen-initiated ordinance voters passed in November 2013.
 
Fayetteville Observer: HF is safe, but are well casings?
We need rigorous guidelines for those well casings and the joints that seal them. And we also will need to have enough well-trained inspectors in the field. Fracking may not pollute, but the wells can - and for a public or private water supply, the source of pollution isn't the issue. Preventing it is.
 
WRAL: Natural gas pipeline concerns some in Nashville
When it comes to a proposed natural gas pipeline through eastern North Carolina, Ronald Bunn sees its path as more than a line through a map. Bunn was at a public meeting in Nashville Monday night to question a plan by Duke Energy and Virginia-based Dominion Resources to build the $5 billion pipeline, which would run parallel to Interstate 95.
 
Newsmax: North Dakota Tops US Income Gains Thanks to Bakken
North Dakota leads the nation in personal income growth. No other state even comes close. From 2008 to 2012, North Dakotans' per-capita income jumped 31 percent, according to the U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis.
 
Pittsburgh Post-Gazette: A day in the life of a longtime DEP inspector
Mr. Sengle, 56, has been working for the past four years in the Clearfield County area with the DEP’s oil and gas division working on natural gas sites, including Marcellus Shale well sites. “My experience for the most part is the companies have been pretty attentive,” he said of the natural gas companies he inspects now.
 
York Dispatch: Corbett, Wolf clash in Hershey debate
Wolf also said he'd like to see the gas industry drilling in the Marcellus Shale deposits in the state charged a 5 percent severance tax. That, he said, would generate an added $1 billion for the state, which could be used for education or other needs. "I'm not trying to kill the goose that lays the golden egg. Let's share that gold with the people of Pennsylvania," Wolf said.
 
Columbus Business First: Production outpacing pipeline regulation, GAO says
Oil and gas production is outpacing both pipeline construction and regulation, and the U.S. Department of Transportation needs to consider making new rules, a federal agency saidMonday. “While the Department of Transportation has worked to identify and address risks, its regulation has not kept pace with the changing oil and gas transportation environment,” the U.S. Government Accountability Office said in its report on oil and gas infrastructure, including pipelines, rail and trucks.
 
State Impact Texas: Oil & Gas Trouble In Texas Ranchland: Whose Road Is It?
The Railroad Commission of Texas will meet Monday morning to consider an issue of huge importance to landowners across Texas. It has to do with how the state oversees energy companies that need access to private land. At issue at the hearing will be pipelines for oil & gas.
 
Chico Enterprise News: State Assembly, Senate candidates face off at Chico forum
While Jawahar was opposed to fracking, calling it a "dirty technology" that uses too much of the state's limited water resource, Nielsen said it is a safe method to develop needed energy resources and that it would be "foolhardy" not to use it. They also conflicted on climate change, with Jawahar saying it's real and that it needs to be addressed and Nielsen saying global warming is a natural process of the planet.

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9-20-14

20 September 2014 2:28pm

The Department of Natural Resources is inviting the public to attend community meetings and provide input on its proposed Eastern Tanana Area Plan (ETAP).  When adopted, ETAP will serve as the basis for the management of state lands and waters on approximately 6.8 million acres of state-owned and state-selected land distributed throughout the Tanana River Valley and the surrounding uplands and the Fairbanks North Star Borough north of the Tanana River. 


Marcelo Cabrera, Cuenca, Ecuador, Mayor, EEUU International Week, Festival, Dave Harbour Photo, Gringo TreePoint of personal privilege.  We were honored today to meet the Honorable Marcelo Cabrera, Mayor of Cuenca, Ecuador, presiding over a festival in San Sebastian Park, honoring the United States following a week of International art and cultural exchanges.  Today's event featured traditional US and Ecuadorian food, music, dancing and speeches.  We can attest that a good time was had by all and that nothing on this beautiful Saturday in the Andes had anything whatsoever to do with North American Energy Policies.  -dh

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9-6-14 Jim Prentice Rises....

06 September 2014 7:14pm

We first met Jim Prentice (NGP Photo) in Calgary while Jim Prentice, Premier, Alberta, Prime Minister, Arctic Gas, Photo by Dave Harbourchairing the Arctic Gas Symposium several years ago.  We visited together over lunch and then came the presentations.  After following his career for nearly a decade we believe that as Premier of Alberta, his service would continue to reflect well on the citizens and his own considerable abilities.  We further believe that he has the experience and judgment required for a future Prime Minister.  Following is today's CBC story by Michelle Bellefontaine & Caitlin Hanson.  -dh

CBC.  Jim Prentice has been named the new leader of the Alberta Progressive Conservative Party and premier designate.

Prentice received 17,963 votes, easily defeating Ric McIver and Thomas Lukaszuk, who obtained 2,742 and 2,681 votes respectively.

“I’m standing here as an Albertan with a sense of pride and feeling of humility,” Prentice said shortly after the announcement was made.

Calling his appointment “a new beginning for Alberta,” Prentice said.... (More)

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6-27-14 Walt Parker

27 June 2014 9:49am

Point of Personal Privilege.  Upon arriving at my Walt Parker, Alaska, Land Use, Commission, Dalton, Keepers, Land Use, Photo by Dave Harbourfirst Alaskan Job with Alaska Methodist University in 1971 (i.e. now, APU), I was greeted warmly by a number of new friends.  

One of those, was Walt Parker (NGP Photo, Circa. 2007), in whose company I spent hours discussing the future of Alaska, the relationship of Alaska's Constitutional principles to the state's prosperity, local land use planning in Anchorage, Alaska Native land claims and the importance of properly developing Alaska's natural resources.

It is, therefore, with sadness for loss of his presence on this earth but appreciation for having known him that I remember him in these pages, and offer heartfelt condolences to his accomplished daughter, Lisa, of whom he has been so immensely proud.

Mike Dunham at the Anchorage daily news has produced a marvelous synopsis of Walt's life, which may be found here.

-dh

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