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Northern Gas Pipelines is your public service 1-stop-shop for Alaska and Canadian Arctic energy commentary, news, history, projects and people. It is informal and rich with new information, updated daily. Here is the most timely and complete Arctic gas pipeline and northern energy archive available anywhere—used by media, academia, government and industry officials throughout the world. Northern Gas Pipelines may be the oldest Alaska blog; we invite readers to suggest others existing before 2001.  -dh

 

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Personal

3-19-15 Lessons For Alaska From Canada

19 March 2015 4:39am

 

Lessons For Alaska From Canada:

Investors Can Go Anywhere.  Get "your act together".  You're not the "only game in town!"      -dh

CBC News.  ConocoPhillips says it doesn't plan to do any more exploration work on its parcel in the N.W.T.'s Canol shale oil play for the foreseeable future.

...

"Although a significant discovery declaration and subsequent significant discovery licence is a positive indication for a play, it does not indicate commercial viability," said Kristen Ashcroft, a spokesperson for ConocoPhillips.

The company says it will return to the site next winter, but only to suspend a well — "a common industry practice to verify the secure condition of a well for the long term," said Ashcroft.

The company would not confirm whether its discovery is oil or natural gas or both.

CBC News.  The sixth annual Yukon First Nations Resource Conference brings together First Nations and mining companies ....

"I see some very, very encouraging signs and I also see some extreme negativity with the bureaucracy in place and some of the regulation and some of the bickering,” says Steve McAlister, director of Sepro Mineral Systems Corp, a company that provides equipment to the mining industry. 

...

"Mining companies can go anywhere in the world, and they're going to go where the risk is least and the projects are most lucrative,” he says.

...

He says companies need certainty when they’re considering investing, and says he, personally, is feeling “ambivalent” about spending his company’s money here.   

His advice for all governments?  "Make sure you have your act together because the Yukon isn't the only game in town."

McAlister adds companies do not like surprises … such as court cases.


Point of personal privilege: Nephew Dave Harbour of Lamar, Colorado makes the clan proud yet again!  Lamar Ledger by Chris Frost.  

Southeastern Developmental Services had a special morning Thursday, March 12, as the American Legion Post 71 stopped by to present the organization with a new American Flag.

...

Post Financial Officer and Adjutant Jesse Herrera said SDS was ready for a new flag.

"What a better day could you have for doing this," he said. "There are so many great people here and this is what we do."

...

Dave Harbour called the gesture a cool time.

"We sure do appreciate Jesse and the guys from the American legion coming down and bringing a new flag to us," he said. "It sure meant a lot to all the clients down here."

Categories:

3-16-15 The Future of Oil Prices According to An Astute Reader - Senators Sullivan's Reputation Spreads

16 March 2015 5:35am

Dan Sullivan, US Senator, Alaska, Maiden Speech, Master Resource, Dave Harbour PhotoOur friend, Rob Bradley, Master ResourceRob Bradley (File Photo-R) of the Master Resource Blog, saw U.S. Senator Dan Sullivan's (NGP Photo) Maiden Senate Speech on this website and has further promoted it to his large international audience (here).  (Our original coverage and speech text)  -dh


Halloran Opines On Proposed Ohio Severance Tax and Future of Oil Prices

James Halloran, Energy Analyst, Ohio, Severance Tax, Oil Prices, Northern Gas PipelinesRepublican Governor Proposes Ohio Severance Tax?  Our friend, Independent Energy Analyst James R. Halloran (File Photo) just returned from the Ohio Oil and Gas Association Winter Meeting where he reported that, "the big issue is Governor Kasich’s proposal for a (completely mis-named) “severance tax”. We will have a lot more on that topic after (maybe) cooling off slightly. Momma did not train this writer to suffer fools gladly, and that is what Ohio is faced with on the topic of taxation of the oil & gas business."

Steve Heimel of APRN retires, Personal, Photo by Dave Harbour(Point of personal privilege: our friend and longtime APRN senior reporter Steve Heimel (NGP Photo)  is retiring after decades covering countless Alaska issues.  -dh)

On oil prices, Halloran says, "The overwhelming question (outside of Ohio) is,  When will oil prices go back up (how high is a second implicit question)? That question was posed to us numerous times at the Winter Meeting. Our standard answer is that oil pricing is a process, not an event. Assume for the moment that Brent oil (we try to stay with the international price for analysis purposes) were to return to $70 by midyear (this is NOT a prediction; it is for discussion purposes): Can we tell them what will happen to the price in the next six months after that?

"The relevant questions that need answering first", he says, "are:

  • "Have there been fundamental changes in the market that will cause crude oil to trade at a different price range than $94-114 for an extended period of time? If so, what are they, and how will they affect the industry longer term?
  • "If the the major inputs to the current market are more likely of a transient nature, what will have to change for prices to recover? Will a price recovery cause some of these transient inputs to recur?"

He elaborates that, "there are some effects that are of a transient nature (maybe) that are significant contributors to the oil price drop, of which we have commented heavily in the last several months:"

  • "The strong dollar, which is following a trend to get even stronger, and which will likely provide a major head wind for any near-term recovery
  • "Massive amounts of capital and incredibly low interest rates, putting many PE, Major, and vulture players ready to jump into the Energy pit. This is related to the strong dollar, and will provide no relief from the fact that there are too many players.
  • "Too much production, which is having a hard time to find a home (see the chart of inventories below, courtesy of Mike Bodell), which graphically illustrates the situation.
  • "Much of the capital cutbacks are coming out of the hide of service companies, so that lower costs will not really bring lower production volumes soon."

"No one is cutting back to the point of ceding “market share” to others. This capitalism at its purest. Unfortunately, it is being done in an environment in which central banks are imposing zero effort to observe capital discipline: Nothing. Nada. Rien. Zip.

"The only “good news” (but less helpful than one might think) is that the rig count continues to drop.  It is too much to try to get trends from the rig count on a weekly basis, so we will be looking at it monthly. This should make it easier to spot trends. Our observations are as follows:

  • "The downturn in rigs is much more directed toward oil (no surprise). Oil rigs are down 45% from our base date last December, compared to 25% down for gas rigs. The Marcellus, Utica, and Eagle Ford, which have large dry gas plays, are not down in rigs as much as the other basins.
  • "Vertical rigs are down much more than horizontals. Also, Small Basins are harder hit than the major basins.  This consistent with the WSJ article, which indicates that major players are still drilling big wells (just not completing them).

"BOTTOM LINE:  The beatings will continue until capital discipline improves and/or the number of players is reduced.  There may be rallies, but they will likely be shallow."  (Note: While Halloran has sources to back his statistics, we removed them in the interest of space.  -dh)

Categories:

2-17-15 "Here's What I Would Do If I Were President"

17 February 2015 10:03am

Charlotte Brower, Alaska North Slope Borough Mayor, Inupiat, ANWR, ARCTIC, OCS, Photo By Dave Harbour

Personal: We join our Fairbanks friends in lamenting the passing of our dear friend, Bob Bettisworth.  -dh

As Interior Secretary Sally Jewell arrives in Alaska, North Slope Borough Mayor Charlotte Brower (NGP Photo) writes that ANWR, "...wilderness proponents ... completely ignore the plight of my people, the Iñupiat."  

Read more here.


What Would You Do If You Were President?

By

Dave Harbour

Tom McInerney, LTG, Fox News Contributor, Copyright Dave Harbour 2013On Sunday, Fox News interviewed one of the wisest combat leaders of the modern era, Lieutenant General Thomas McInerney, USAF-Retired (NGP Photo), co-author of Endgame: The Blueprint for Victory in the War on Terror.   

In addition to his extensive combat service, McInerney served as commanding general of the Alaska Command and coordinated military efforts in support of the Exxon Valdez clean up activity.  He and his tough combat team also kept a close eye and air interception assets trained on Russian bombers, continually testing Alaskan air space defenses.* 

At conclusion of the Fox interview, He was asked what he would do in the face of ISIS aggression in the Middle East.  With a steady, focused gaze on the interviewer, he delivered a brief, powerful and logical response.  If McInerney’s words had come from the mouth of a president, all Americans would have cheered and felt a renewed sense of national pride in strong, reliable and wise presidential leadership.

Without detouring into a war policy discussion, we would paraphrase from the McInerney interview a question from the viewpoint of our energy audience:  If you were president, how would you enable the U.S. to become energy independent?  So we decided to have some fun today and perhaps render a national service at the same time.** 

We will give our response below, then ask our U.S. readers (and Canadian or other foreign readers) for suggestions, additions and corrections, sent to this address.

Here we go:

“If I were president, I would enable the U.S. to become energy independent in these ways:”

  • "I would approve the Keystone XL pipeline before going to bed tonight, based on earlier, plentiful recommendations of the Department of State; the 40 thousand jobs it will produce; the hundreds of millions of dollars it will provide to local, state and federal governments; the improved national defense capabilities created by greater energy and economic independence; and the benefits that will flow to our largest trading partner, Canada."
  • "I would approve oil and gas exploration and development on a small sliver of land within the 19 million acre Arctic National Wildlife Refuge.  That sliver is roughly the size of Dulles Airport within a land mass the size of the state of North Carolina – which itself is a small part of the entire state of Alaska.  That land sliver has already been designated by Congress for oil and gas potential.  I would approve it for mostly winter work when the migratory wildlife are not in the area."
  • "I would open the entire National Petroleum Reserve-Alaska to energy leasing subject to our customary stringent rules.  I would not keep half of it locked up – and the other half choked with irresponsible regulatory barriers -- as the Obama administration has done."
  • "I would ask of Alaska's Governor, 'We know the Trans Alaska Pipeline System (TAPS) is now running at almost 3/4 empty.  What can the Federal government do with its federal assets to keep TAPS operating sustainably, since for my administration this energy umbilical cord attaches the United States to the huge, future oil potential of the Arctic?'"
  • "Since 3/4 of America's coastline surrounds Alaska, a state 20% the size of the entire nation and over twice as large as Texas, I would give Alaska's governor -- and Congressional Delegation -- an open invitation to suggest federal policies that improve Alaska's economy while protecting the environment and strengthening the entire nation."
  • "I would massively restrict the size of many regulatory agencies, including the EPA, which has become a monster devouring the wealth of America without much to show for it -- except a ballooning bureaucracy and economic devastation wherever it rolls.  I would tell the EPA it cannot preemptively disapprove projects, in violation of the rule of law.  I would order the agency to lay off Hydraulic Fracturing and leave its regulation to the states, which have safely regulated it for decades."
  • "I would immediately nullify Obama's overreaching and unlawful executive orders.  The famous ones deal with exceptions to the Affordable Care Act and providing massive citizen benefits to illegal alien non-citizens, but also include illegal, non-Congressionally approved natural resource blocking proposals, like the Ocean Policy executive order."
  • "I would work with Congress to eliminate the possibility of opaque 'sue and settle' litigation, which impoverishes the country one lawsuit at a time.  I would coordinate with Congress other judicial branch reforms that would remove any financial incentives for filing frivolous environmental lawsuits that would delay or block jobs and reasonable economic development.”
  • "I would form an American Energy Independence Presidential Task Force, to include a special sub-committee on Alaskan Arctic Energy and Military policies."  The purpose of the Task Force would be:
    • to provide the President and Congress with detailed suggestions on how America may develop a rational, long term, sustainable energy policy based upon energy self-sufficiency and support of the nation's defense.
    • to assure that energy and military policy recommendations included defending and advocating for proper jurisdictional control of Arctic sea, sea bottom and trade routes. 
    • to complete its work within six months,

"I would ask Congress to support the resulting FINAL, sustainable energy policy of which I approve. ”

  • “I would replace the White House Council on Environmental Quality with a new White House Council on Economic and Environmental Policy.  Under my direct supervision, the Council will provide a steady stream of recommendations about how to reorganize Executive Branch agencies to best accommodate any FINAL, sustainable energy policy recommended by the American Energy Independence Presidential Task Force.  In addition, an important role of the Council will be to review any new agency order, regulatory or statutory proposal that would affect the FINAL, sustainable energy policy adopted by the White House.  Following review, the Council will make a recommendation to the President for further action.  These sorts of action will include agency efforts to declare critical habitats or endangered species regulations under the ESA and similar exercises of agency powers under the CWA and CAA.”
  • “I would ask the oil, gas and wind energy industries to nominate on- and off-shore areas for leasing and based on that input, as evaluated by the new White House Council on Economic and Environmental Policy, order expedited changes to the Department of Interior’s leasing programs.”
  • "I would get rid of the crude oil export ban and do everything possible to arrange for U.S. energy exports to European nations dependent upon Russian energy imports."
  • "I will tell our friends in the Middle East, especially the Saudis, that they cannot interfere in our domestic energy policy issues, nor can they any longer provide funding to enemies of the United States unless they are willing to lose American friendship, energy trade and military support.”
  • "I will redouble efforts to coordinate energy and other international policies with our Canadian, Israeli, British, Australian and other allies."
  • "I will put into place a 'US Task Force for Latin American Energy, Economic and Cultural Independence', and spend significant personal time with the Secretary of State, coordinating cooperative energy, economic development, immigration and regional defense policies with the presidents of the countries in our own hemisphere."
  • "America will once again speak softly but carry a big stick.  We will state our position on energy and other multilateral issues.  We will clearly state the result of accommodating or opposing our reasonable requests.  Based on reactions, we shall respond decisively.  Our negotiations with countries that have proven to be unreliable negotiating partners in the past shall not be extended.  We expect results and we will act as promised.  We will never draw red lines in the sand and not enforce our positions; neither will we ever leave any American citizen, federal employee or military member to the enemy's wrath without maximum effort to save that person or those persons.  Every policy we undertake will be designed to be fair, reasonable, just and serious.  We shall not bargain for energy industry or other hostages but will rain negative actions on those who hold, take, threaten, mistreat or kill hostages.”  

For starters, that's what we'd do for energy were we president.  

Oh, and we'd make sure to always keep the good counsel of competent Americans like LTG McInerney very close to us.  

Unlike certain unsavory White House guests entertained by the previous administration, I would hope to have distinguished Americans like McInerney, Franklin Graham, Greta Van Susteren, Steve Forbes, Harris Faulkner, ​Scott Walker, Ben Carson, Alveda King, as regular visitors to the Oval Office.

(Now, Dear Reader, let's have your additions, corrections or suggestions!  -dh)


*Your author had the honor of serving on LTG McInerney's Civilian Advisory Board over 2 decades ago with great friends and important figures in Alaskan history like Governor Walter J. Hickel, Publisher Bob Atwood, aviation pioneer Bill Brooks, and community leaders Sharon AndersonErnie Hall and Al Fleetwood.


**We would also like to ask: "What else would you do if you were President, to secure the country’s future?"  The imagination rings with the President's other executive actions, EPA overreach, Fast and Furious, Federal suing of sovereign states, IRS illegal targeting, media spying, etc., but will leave that exercise to our non-energy colleagues.)  


Robert Dillon of the U.S. Senate Energy and Natural Resources committee writes today about Interior Secretary Sally Jewell's Alaska visit.  

Mayor Charlotte Brower, Alaska North Slope Borough Mayor, Photo copyright Dave Harbour 2012He comments that Jewell,"is in Anchorage today preparing to host a press conference in a couple of hours on her trip to the Arctic communities of Kotzebue and Kivalina. While the secretary will undoubtedly focus her remarks on climate, I wanted to share the opinion piece below from North Slope Borough Mayor Charlotte Brower (NGP Photo). Ms. Brower, an Inupiaq Eskimo from Barrow, provides a unique counterpoint to Secretary Jewell’s efforts to lock up Alaska as if it was one big national park. Ms. Brower writes about the prosperity and economic opportunity that responsible oil production has brought to some of Alaska’s most remote communities and how this administration’s policies are endangering the future Alaskans are attempting to build for their children. -Dillon

ANWR worshippers fail to consider the Iñupiat (AK Dispatch/Opinion)

http://bit.ly/1AO8iP5

The Iñupiat Eskimo lived on Alaska’s North Slope for countless generations -- unknown to the outside world. Our culture, social structure and our survival depended on our ability to utilize the abundant resources that bless our region.

Over time, we found our lifestyle threatened when the thirst for resources drove others to our corner of globe, first for whales and later for oil.

Today, we are under assault by people who seek another resource -- wilderness. And just like those who came before them, they threaten the health of our communities, our culture and our way of life. President Obama’s announcement to seek wilderness designations throughout the entire Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, represents the latest salvo by the powerful environmental lobby to obtain their El Dorado.  Read the rest of the Op-Ed here....

Charlotte Brower is mayor of the North Slope Borough.

Categories:

1-25-15, Sunday

25 January 2015 5:03am

Points of personal privilege: on this beautiful Sunday, we note the following personal items and leave you witha poetic prayer.

1.  Kudos to all but a big hug and kiss to Nancy for a career of accomplishment far above and beyond any call of duty! -dh

From the Arctic Sounder:

'Last week seven directors of various nonprofits in the state were awarded a six-month break through the Rasmuson Foundation Sabbatical Program.

The recipients come from five communities across the state and include professionals in arts, and health and social services.

"Among them are Guy Adams, who is the CEO of the Northwest Inupiat Housing Authority in Kotzebue, and Marie Carroll who is the executive director of the Arctic Slope Native Association in Barrow. Also receiving the award were Nancy Harbour of Alaska Center for the Performing Arts in Anchorage, Marcia Howell of the Alaska Injury Prevention Center in Anchorage, Laurie Kari who runs the Mat-Su Valley Interfaith Hospitality Network DBA Family Promise Mat-Su in Wasilla, Rebecca Shields of the Kodiak Women's Resource and Crisis Center in Kodiak and Pauline Smith who runs the Alaska Literacy Program in Anchorage".  http://www.thearcticsounder.com/…/1504arctic_executives_awa…

​2.  Dr Charles Stanley, Alaska Cruise, Dave Harbour, Northern Gas Pipelines, Faith, what we sow, more than we sow, later than we sowToday we pursue our typical Sunday schedule:  exercise; good healthy, natural breakfast; an hour with our friend, Dr. Charles Stanley; and, an hour at our church.  

In thanking you for being our reader, we must state an acknowledgement that we are imperfect in perhaps all ways but strive toward that lofty goal from waking at dawn to time for blissful sleep come evening.  We also acknowledge that in the 'striving' we are also imperfect.

God bless you and yours.  

-dh

_______________________________________________

Email response to two Kenai Peninsula NGP Readers who constantly give us nourishing feedback. 

To: B & A C.......

You light up my life and keep my spirits high!  Thank you.

Here is a Sunday poem for you and A:
_________________________________________________
 
To B. and A. Cxxx., for faithful, inspirational support.
___________________________________________
          Ode to Tears of Praise
 
Why is it that when I pray,
     I often end my prayer in tears?
Because my pleas cause You to hear:
     my flowing tears praise You today,
small thanks for hope and vanquished fears.
 
-Dave Harbour, Sunday, January 25, 2015
 
 
_________________________________________________

----- Original Message -----

From: "B & A" <xxxxxxxxxx@acsalaska.net>
To:

"DAVE HARBOUR" <harbour@gci.net>

Cc:

 

Sent:

Sat, 24 Jan 2015 13:01:58 -0900

Subject:

KEEP UP YOUR GREAT WORK, DAVE HARBOUR!

DAVE . . . SO MUCH NEWS APPEARS ALL OVER THE MEDIA BUT WE CANNOT ALWAYS TRUST THAT THE DETAILS ARE ACCURATE . . .SO . . . WE ARE VERY  “INSPIRED”  AND VERY LUCKY. . .TO HAVE YOUR COLUMN.

WE KNOW YOU ARE PROVIDING IMPORTANT INFORMATION FOR ALASKANS/AMERICANS . . . and we hope you CONTINUE TO SHARE THESE DETAILS!!!

YES, DAVE . . .A. AND I TRULY BELIEVE THAT GOD BOOSTS OUR MORALE BY SENDING SOMEONE LIKE YOU WHO BELIEVES IN KEEPING OUR AMERICA FOCUSED ON GOD’S PLANS!  KEEP INSPIRING US, DAVE!!!

BLESSINGS!

B

Categories:

12-25-14 Merry Christmas!

25 December 2014 3:19pm

Bill Tobin, William J Tobin, Anchorage Times, Christmas, Photo by Dave Harbour, Bob Atwood, Evangeline Atwood

On Christmas, we remember how our friend, Bill Tobin (NGP Photo), used to include this Christmas Tree every year on the Anchorage Times editorial page.  We are delighted to carry on the tradition and reprint Bill's Christmas Tree below as a tribute to our great Alaska predecessors and as a commitment to honor and propagate and emulate their pioneering spirits.


MERRY CHRISTMAS!

 

On 

This Eve 

Of Christmas, 

We Once Again 

Decorate A Little 

Tree To Say Thanks To 

All Of You Who have Blessed 

Us With Your Friendship Over 

More years Than We Care To Count. 

And 

As These 

Have Unfolded, 

More And More We 

Have Come To Realize 

That The World Is Filled 

More By Goodness Than It 

Is By Evil, And That A Smile 

Goes Much Farther Than A Frown. 

We Are 

Reminded That 

It's Better To Light 

One Little Candle Than 

It Is To Curse The Darkness, 

And That Mostly Has Been The 

Mission Of This Little Corner Of The 

Times For All These Years That We Have 

Been Enriched By The Opportunity To Be 

With Faithful Readers, Week After Week. 

And 

At Almost 

Every Christmas 

We Have Offered Here 

The Holy Prayer Of St. Francis 

Of Assisi, And With Joy We Do So 

Again, In Hopes It Reflects Simple Ways 

We Each Could Help Build A Better World: 

Lord 

Make Me 

An Instrument Of 

Your Peace. Where There 

Is Hatred, Let Me Sow Love; 

Where There Is Injury, Pardon; 

Where There Is Doubt, Faith; Where 

There Is Despair, Hope; Where There Is 

Darkness, Light; And Where There Is Sadness, 

Joy. 

O Divine 

Master, Grant 

That I May Not So 

Much Seek To Be Consoled 

As To Console; To Be Understood 

As To Understand; To Be Loved As To 

Love; For It Is In Giving That We Receive; 

It Is In Pardoning That We Are Pardoned, And 

 It Is In Dying That 

We Are Born 

To Eternal 

Life. 

                                                                                 - William J. Tobin

Categories:

10-14-14 Dandelions and Energy - National Poll Supports Offshore Oil & Gas

14 October 2014 6:07am

National Poll Supports OCS O&G 

Today's Commentary: Energy, Daisies, Dandelions, Poppies and Bureaucracies

Janet Weiss, BP Alaska, Oklahoma State University, Hall of Fame, Dave Harbour PhotoThe College of Engineering, Architecture and Technology at Oklahoma State University inducted five industry leaders into its Hall of Fame last Saturday including 1986 Chemical Engineering graduate,  Janet Weiss (NGP Photo) now President of BP Alaska.

More....

CEA POLL SHOWS MAJORITY SUPPORT IN KEY STATES FOR OFFSHORE DRILLING: 

Consumer Energy Alliance voter polls conducted in three states with pivotal U.S. Senate races finds strong support for allowing oil and natural gas drilling in U.S. waters inside the Arctic Circle. The poll finds Alaska, Georgia and Louisiana each have  close races for U.S. Senate that will indicate the direction of federal policy towards offshore energy.  More.... 

*     *     *

Also...see our recent commentary on the effect of the Senate races on Alaska energy policy.  -dh

 


How Government Deals With One Invasive Species, The Dandelion

by

Dave Harbour

(Point of personal privilege)

Dandelions, invasive specie, public monies, bureaucratic bungling, wasted tax dollars, Photo by Dave Harbouro, Federal Highway Dollars, public landscapes, poor maintenanceThis is, admittedly, a pet peeve.  The only way I could relate the dandelion invasion to our study of energy, is to make a point that bureaucracies will never be as efficient with public dollars as citizens are with family dollars.  

invasive species, dandelion, daisies, poppies, public rights of way, landscaping, bureaucratic bungling, Photo by Dave HarbourAs a homeowner, I go out and dig up every new dandelion.  My wife plants a wonderful array of floribunda alaskana every spring.  Church volunteers cull dandelions and cultivate daisies.  

But government cultivates dandelions and kills desirable species while simultaneously holding 'Invasive Species Workshops'.  

This morning I provided a comment to Alaska Business Monthly regarding an upcoming 'Invasive Species Workshop' listed on its Industry News page.  I don't know if the organizers will make a dent in the invasion of unwanted species next year.  They do justify spending public money on workshops and publications and 'public outreach' -- which incrementally increases the demand for higher taxes.  So, hopefully, the effort will produce cost-effective results.

Meanwhile, with a little common sense, at no additional cost and without workshops government planners could significantly slow the spread of one invasive species, the dandelion.

In our primary area of interest and expertise, energy, one notes that with North Dakota oil and gas production being on mostly private property, it flourishes (Also note Texas, Pennsylvania, Ohio, etc.).  But in federal areas, bureaucracies stop production before it begins while cultivating their own, invasive bureaucratic growth.  For example, observe the gold plated offices, in Anchorage, inhabited by Department of Interior agencies along with their hundreds of employees, including huge public relations staffs.  And, what is their demonstrated, primary role: stopping human activity in a state whose Constitution requires development of natural resources.

The invasive dandelions of government are protected while entrepreneurial daisies and poppies are cut down and eventually culled out of existence.

To continue this little allegory, below we reprint for your information and, perhaps, entertainment, "A Dandelion Story", slightly modified for our readers.

P.S.  If Invasive Species Workshop participants do make a dent this coming year in stopping or slowing the growth of invasive species -- particularly the dandelion invasion -- we will look forward to receiving information from them and including it in our searchable archives.  We know these public employees are well intended and we look forward to hearing about their results. 


Commentary for readers: Alaska Business Monthly (as modified)

A government-sponsored "Invasive Species Workshop" will occur October 28-30 in Anchorage (www.alaskainvasives.org).

Anchorage School District Headquarters, Cultivate Invasive Specie, Dandelion, Dave Harbour Photo, ASDGovernment agencies have generally ignored the invasive species 'elephant in the room', the ubiquitous dandelion.

From public rights of way, dandelion seeds attack neighborhood lawns and establish beach heads throughout our wilderness.

We plant daisies and poppies in the rights of way to meet beautification / landscaping / environmental standards for federal dollars. But the folks who make the plans don't maintain the projects.

Then, dandelions invade. The dandelions are first to pop up in May and early June. Smart maintenance managers could mow then, before yellow dandelion flowers go to seed and before delicate poppy and daisy heads pop up.

But no. Maintenance managers allow the dandelions to flower then go to seed, just as the wonderful poppies and daisies are coming up in mid to late June. The street/highway maintenance managers then send out the lawn mowers to cut down the dandelions just as they are going to seed, spreading the invasive seed, while simultaneously cutting off the heads of daisies and poppies before they can develop seeds.

Most summers there is a bumper crop of dandelions in August. Simultaneously, a few remaining daisies and poppies try again to propagate--just in time for the 2nd mowing.

At the forest edge of East Northern Lights Blvd. in Anchorage, where mowing does not occur, the daisies flourish and dandelions are sparse.

East High School, Cultivate Invasive Specie, Dandelion, Dave Harbour Photo, ASD

Where the miscoordinated mowing occurs, the expensively planted daisies and poppies die off for lack of progeny while the invasive dandelions multiply with help from street/highway maintenance managers.  

​Other government agencies also cultivate the invasive species in this way.  The Anchorage School District, with its own thoughtless mowing practices, is a major cultivator of invasive dandelions whose seeds invade nearby neighborhoods throughout the city.

Invasive specie, Alaska, Dandelion, street maintenance, Dave Harbour Photo

It seems that an "Invasive Species Workshop" goal should be to "pick the low-hanging invasive fruit". By simply changing the mowing schedules, maintenance managers could cheaply and efficiently accomplish two goals:

1.  They could restrain the propagation of the most invasive of plant species, while

2.  simultaneously protecting taxpayer landscape investments intended to beautify public rights of way and other government properties.

Respectfully,

Dave Harbour

Ref: http://tinyurl.com/mktjs5v, http://tinyurl.com/qbpuhve, http://tinyurl.com/k7ubpdg 


 

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(STILLWATER, Okla., October 13, 2014) – The College of Engineering, Architecture and Technology at Oklahoma State University inducted five industry leaders into its Hall of Fame on Saturday, Oct. 11. More than 250 people were present at the ConocoPhillips Alumni Center to recognize the achievements of those extraordinary individuals.

Hall of Fame inductees included Debbie Adams (’83 Chemical Engineering), Harold Courson (‘52-‘55 Engineering), Jeff Hume (‘75 Petroleum Engineering Technology), David Timberlake (‘65 Architectural Engineering) and Janet Weiss (‘86 Chemical Engineering).

These distinguished professionals were honored by OSU for their exceptional leadership and contributions to advancing the fields of engineering, architecture and technology.

Debbie Adams currently serves as the Senior Vice President of Phillips 66 based in Houston, Texas. After graduating from OSU with her chemical engineering degree in 1983, she began her career in oil and gas as a process engineer with Conoco. She worked in several capacities for the company, including roles that took her to Sweden and England after the 2002 merger that created ConocoPhillips. During the most recent transition that resulted in the formation of Phillips 66, Adams was named the President of Transportation and promoted to Senior Vice President. She currently serves on the Board of Trustees and Board of Governors for the OSU Foundation.

Harold Courson attended the engineering program at Oklahoma A&M from 1952-1955 before leaving to pursue the oil and gas drilling business. He purchased speculative gas leases in the Texas panhandle and founded Courson Oil and Gas in 1960. His company drilled two of the first horizontal wells in the early 1970s, one of which is still producing today. He has served three terms as Mayor of Perryton, Texas, and is currently the Chairman for Courson Oil and Gas, Inc. and Natural Gas Anadarko Company. Courson was one of 100 recognized as a History Maker of the High Plains by the Amarillo Globe-News.

Jeff Hume is a 1975 Petroleum Engineering Technology graduate who began his career prior to his time at OSU. Immediately following high school, Hume worked as a roustabout in the oil fields outside Enid. He soon realized his passion for the industry and came to Stillwater to obtain his degree. Since that time, he has been a leader for Continental Resources, Inc. for more than 30 years. Hume is a registered professional engineer and member of the Society of Petroleum Engineers. He is currently the Vice Chairman of Strategic Growth Initiatives for Continental Resources, Inc.

A 1965 Architectural Engineering graduate, David Timberlake received his degree and joined the Army Corps of Engineers before transitioning to the private sector. In Washington D.C., he worked in structural engineering and construction inspection for government buildings. There he met an influential colleague who led him on the path to founding his own company — Timberlake Construction. The company has built structures in 48 of the 50 states and its founder currently serves as Chairman and CEO.

Janet Weiss brought her love for math and science, especially chemistry, to OSU when she enrolled in the Chemical Engineering program. Her father, Dr. Franklin Leach, was a professor of biochemistry at OSU, so Janet grew up gaining a love for learning from her father and the university. She graduated in 1986 and began her career at ARCO, where she moved through the ranks. For the past 14 years, Weiss has worked for BP, and she has been a leader in the oil and gas industry. She currently serves as President of BP Alaska and is a published author on the Kuparuk River Field. Weiss is an active member of the Alaska Oil and Gas Association Board, University of Alaska Fairbanks Advisory Board and the Anchorage United Way Board.

Following Saturday’s ceremony, the College of Engineering, Architecture and Technology has recognized 101 Hall of Fame inductees.

For more information on the College of Engineering, Architecture and Technology at OSU, visitwww.ceat.okstate.edu 

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