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Northern Gas Pipelines is your public service 1-stop-shop for Alaska and Canadian Arctic energy commentary, news, history, projects and people. It is informal and rich with new information, updated daily. Here is the most timely and complete Arctic gas pipeline and northern energy archive available anywhere—used by media, academia, government and industry officials throughout the world. Northern Gas Pipelines may be the oldest Alaska blog; we invite readers to suggest others existing before 2001.

 

10-15-14 World's Biggest Oil Users

15 October 2014 5:02am

According to Andrew Topf of Oil Price, of the ten countries with the largest per capita use of oil, the United States is not even in the top five.  She's #8, right behind Canada!  -dh


 

10-14-14 Dandelions and Energy - National Poll Supports Offshore Oil & Gas

14 October 2014 6:07am

National Poll Supports OCS O&G 

Today's Commentary: Energy, Daisies, Dandelions, Poppies and Bureaucracies

Janet Weiss, BP Alaska, Oklahoma State University, Hall of Fame, Dave Harbour PhotoThe College of Engineering, Architecture and Technology at Oklahoma State University inducted five industry leaders into its Hall of Fame last Saturday including 1986 Chemical Engineering graduate,  Janet Weiss (NGP Photo) now President of BP Alaska.

More....

CEA POLL SHOWS MAJORITY SUPPORT IN KEY STATES FOR OFFSHORE DRILLING: 

Consumer Energy Alliance voter polls conducted in three states with pivotal U.S. Senate races finds strong support for allowing oil and natural gas drilling in U.S. waters inside the Arctic Circle. The poll finds Alaska, Georgia and Louisiana each have  close races for U.S. Senate that will indicate the direction of federal policy towards offshore energy.  More.... 

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Also...see our recent commentary on the effect of the Senate races on Alaska energy policy.  -dh

 


How Government Deals With One Invasive Species, The Dandelion

by

Dave Harbour

(Point of personal privilege)

Dandelions, invasive specie, public monies, bureaucratic bungling, wasted tax dollars, Photo by Dave Harbouro, Federal Highway Dollars, public landscapes, poor maintenanceThis is, admittedly, a pet peeve.  The only way I could relate the dandelion invasion to our study of energy, is to make a point that bureaucracies will never be as efficient with public dollars as citizens are with family dollars.  

invasive species, dandelion, daisies, poppies, public rights of way, landscaping, bureaucratic bungling, Photo by Dave HarbourAs a homeowner, I go out and dig up every new dandelion.  My wife plants a wonderful array of floribunda alaskana every spring.  Church volunteers cull dandelions and cultivate daisies.  

But government cultivates dandelions and kills desirable species while simultaneously holding 'Invasive Species Workshops'.  

This morning I provided a comment to Alaska Business Monthly regarding an upcoming 'Invasive Species Workshop' listed on its Industry News page.  I don't know if the organizers will make a dent in the invasion of unwanted species next year.  They do justify spending public money on workshops and publications and 'public outreach' -- which incrementally increases the demand for higher taxes.  So, hopefully, the effort will produce cost-effective results.

Meanwhile, with a little common sense, at no additional cost and without workshops government planners could significantly slow the spread of one invasive species, the dandelion.

In our primary area of interest and expertise, energy, one notes that with North Dakota oil and gas production being on mostly private property, it flourishes (Also note Texas, Pennsylvania, Ohio, etc.).  But in federal areas, bureaucracies stop production before it begins while cultivating their own, invasive bureaucratic growth.  For example, observe the gold plated offices, in Anchorage, inhabited by Department of Interior agencies along with their hundreds of employees, including huge public relations staffs.  And, what is their demonstrated, primary role: stopping human activity in a state whose Constitution requires development of natural resources.

The invasive dandelions of government are protected while entrepreneurial daisies and poppies are cut down and eventually culled out of existence.

To continue this little allegory, below we reprint for your information and, perhaps, entertainment, "A Dandelion Story", slightly modified for our readers.

P.S.  If Invasive Species Workshop participants do make a dent this coming year in stopping or slowing the growth of invasive species -- particularly the dandelion invasion -- we will look forward to receiving information from them and including it in our searchable archives.  We know these public employees are well intended and we look forward to hearing about their results. 


Commentary for readers: Alaska Business Monthly (as modified)

A government-sponsored "Invasive Species Workshop" will occur October 28-30 in Anchorage (www.alaskainvasives.org).

Anchorage School District Headquarters, Cultivate Invasive Specie, Dandelion, Dave Harbour Photo, ASDGovernment agencies have generally ignored the invasive species 'elephant in the room', the ubiquitous dandelion.

From public rights of way, dandelion seeds attack neighborhood lawns and establish beach heads throughout our wilderness.

We plant daisies and poppies in the rights of way to meet beautification / landscaping / environmental standards for federal dollars. But the folks who make the plans don't maintain the projects.

Then, dandelions invade. The dandelions are first to pop up in May and early June. Smart maintenance managers could mow then, before yellow dandelion flowers go to seed and before delicate poppy and daisy heads pop up.

But no. Maintenance managers allow the dandelions to flower then go to seed, just as the wonderful poppies and daisies are coming up in mid to late June. The street/highway maintenance managers then send out the lawn mowers to cut down the dandelions just as they are going to seed, spreading the invasive seed, while simultaneously cutting off the heads of daisies and poppies before they can develop seeds.

Most summers there is a bumper crop of dandelions in August. Simultaneously, a few remaining daisies and poppies try again to propagate--just in time for the 2nd mowing.

At the forest edge of East Northern Lights Blvd. in Anchorage, where mowing does not occur, the daisies flourish and dandelions are sparse.

East High School, Cultivate Invasive Specie, Dandelion, Dave Harbour Photo, ASD

Where the miscoordinated mowing occurs, the expensively planted daisies and poppies die off for lack of progeny while the invasive dandelions multiply with help from street/highway maintenance managers.  

​Other government agencies also cultivate the invasive species in this way.  The Anchorage School District, with its own thoughtless mowing practices, is a major cultivator of invasive dandelions whose seeds invade nearby neighborhoods throughout the city.

Invasive specie, Alaska, Dandelion, street maintenance, Dave Harbour Photo

It seems that an "Invasive Species Workshop" goal should be to "pick the low-hanging invasive fruit". By simply changing the mowing schedules, maintenance managers could cheaply and efficiently accomplish two goals:

1.  They could restrain the propagation of the most invasive of plant species, while

2.  simultaneously protecting taxpayer landscape investments intended to beautify public rights of way and other government properties.

Respectfully,

Dave Harbour

Ref: http://tinyurl.com/mktjs5v, http://tinyurl.com/qbpuhve, http://tinyurl.com/k7ubpdg 


 

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(STILLWATER, Okla., October 13, 2014) – The College of Engineering, Architecture and Technology at Oklahoma State University inducted five industry leaders into its Hall of Fame on Saturday, Oct. 11. More than 250 people were present at the ConocoPhillips Alumni Center to recognize the achievements of those extraordinary individuals.

Hall of Fame inductees included Debbie Adams (’83 Chemical Engineering), Harold Courson (‘52-‘55 Engineering), Jeff Hume (‘75 Petroleum Engineering Technology), David Timberlake (‘65 Architectural Engineering) and Janet Weiss (‘86 Chemical Engineering).

These distinguished professionals were honored by OSU for their exceptional leadership and contributions to advancing the fields of engineering, architecture and technology.

Debbie Adams currently serves as the Senior Vice President of Phillips 66 based in Houston, Texas. After graduating from OSU with her chemical engineering degree in 1983, she began her career in oil and gas as a process engineer with Conoco. She worked in several capacities for the company, including roles that took her to Sweden and England after the 2002 merger that created ConocoPhillips. During the most recent transition that resulted in the formation of Phillips 66, Adams was named the President of Transportation and promoted to Senior Vice President. She currently serves on the Board of Trustees and Board of Governors for the OSU Foundation.

Harold Courson attended the engineering program at Oklahoma A&M from 1952-1955 before leaving to pursue the oil and gas drilling business. He purchased speculative gas leases in the Texas panhandle and founded Courson Oil and Gas in 1960. His company drilled two of the first horizontal wells in the early 1970s, one of which is still producing today. He has served three terms as Mayor of Perryton, Texas, and is currently the Chairman for Courson Oil and Gas, Inc. and Natural Gas Anadarko Company. Courson was one of 100 recognized as a History Maker of the High Plains by the Amarillo Globe-News.

Jeff Hume is a 1975 Petroleum Engineering Technology graduate who began his career prior to his time at OSU. Immediately following high school, Hume worked as a roustabout in the oil fields outside Enid. He soon realized his passion for the industry and came to Stillwater to obtain his degree. Since that time, he has been a leader for Continental Resources, Inc. for more than 30 years. Hume is a registered professional engineer and member of the Society of Petroleum Engineers. He is currently the Vice Chairman of Strategic Growth Initiatives for Continental Resources, Inc.

A 1965 Architectural Engineering graduate, David Timberlake received his degree and joined the Army Corps of Engineers before transitioning to the private sector. In Washington D.C., he worked in structural engineering and construction inspection for government buildings. There he met an influential colleague who led him on the path to founding his own company — Timberlake Construction. The company has built structures in 48 of the 50 states and its founder currently serves as Chairman and CEO.

Janet Weiss brought her love for math and science, especially chemistry, to OSU when she enrolled in the Chemical Engineering program. Her father, Dr. Franklin Leach, was a professor of biochemistry at OSU, so Janet grew up gaining a love for learning from her father and the university. She graduated in 1986 and began her career at ARCO, where she moved through the ranks. For the past 14 years, Weiss has worked for BP, and she has been a leader in the oil and gas industry. She currently serves as President of BP Alaska and is a published author on the Kuparuk River Field. Weiss is an active member of the Alaska Oil and Gas Association Board, University of Alaska Fairbanks Advisory Board and the Anchorage United Way Board.

Following Saturday’s ceremony, the College of Engineering, Architecture and Technology has recognized 101 Hall of Fame inductees.

For more information on the College of Engineering, Architecture and Technology at OSU, visitwww.ceat.okstate.edu 

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10-13-14 Federal Policies Undermine Alaska's Enormous Energy Potential

13 October 2014 5:46am

Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee Communications Director, Robert Robert Dillon, Communications Director, Senate Energy Committee, Alaska, Federal Overreach, New York Times Article, Photo by Dave HarbourDillon (NGP Photo), wrote us this morning, "The New York Times recently ran an article with a headline pronouncing the “end” of Alaska’s energy boom. The reporter focused on how economic anxiety is affecting the state’s Senate election, but in doing so, missed a critical point about Alaska’s “dwindling” production: the main reason it continues to fall is because the federal government refuses to allow access to the vast resources on federally controlled lands."  Here is the NYT article, by Kirk Johnson.  Below is Dillon's full response which we recommend to all of our readers.  -dh

Response To NYT Alaska Energy Article

by

Robert Dillon

Today's Other Energy Links:

CBC.  A meeting report between Prime Minister Stephen Harper and new Alberta Premier Jim Prentice, "...Prentice campaigned on that experience and has highlighted the importance of market access for Alberta oil during his time as premier so far."


World Energy News.  Russia's state-controlled gas company Gazprom may drop its Vladivostok LNG project in Russia's Far East in favour of pipeline gas supplies to China, the firm's Chief Executive Alexei Miller told reporters ... (today). ​

Fairbanks News Miner Op-Ed by Bruce Campbell.  ...no one has done more to impede and slow the development of Alaska’s natural gas than (Bill) Walker. If this is his idea of “support,” voters need to be wary of his claims to “support” any issue....


Huffington Post.  Outside super PACs have played a major role supporting Sen. Mark Begich (D) as he faces a tough re-election race against former Alaska Natural Resources commissioner Dan Sullivan (R). (We recently analyzed the effect of this race on energy policy.  -dh)

We certainly accept the premise of the New York Times article. Falling production is provoking economic anxiety, bordering on an economic crisis, in Alaska. Yet, it is also completely unnecessary, because there’s plenty of oil in Alaska.  In its Annual Energy Outlook for 2014, the Energy Information Administration estimates that Alaska – alone – has 38 billion barrels of technically recoverable oil. Some of that oil is located on state lands, in the form of reserves at existing fields.  But the lion’s share is in the Outer Continental Shelf (23 billion barrels), the non-wilderness portion of the Arctic Coastal Plain (over 10 billion barrels), and the National Petroleum Reserve-Alaska (roughly 1 billion barrels).

It’s also important to keep in mind that whenever Alaskans are actually allowed to look for oil, we tend to find more than expected.  So in a massive state with huge swaths of land that remain unexplored, 38 billion barrels could ultimately prove to be an underestimate.  Certainly, that was the case with Prudhoe Bay, which is now at 17 billion barrels produced and counting.       

For today’s purposes, though, we’ll stick with EIA’s number: 38 billion barrels of oil.  How much is that, exactly?  Well, if produced at a rate of 1 million barrels per day, Alaska’s oil would last for 38,000 days – or about 104 years.  If production is allowed to reach even higher rates, Alaska could have enough resource in the ground to replace nearly 30 years of oil imports from OPEC or more than 50 years of oil imports from the Persian Gulf.               

The problem is that the federal government, which controls more than 60 percent of the land in Alaska, has repeatedly blocked efforts to develop our resources.  Despite President Obama’s willingness to take credit for rising production on state and private lands in the Lower 48, his real record is best revealed in places like Alaska.  He and his administration have repeatedly denied access to promising lands; blocked or delayed the approval of roads and bridges needed so that production can begin; and issued regulations that fail to hold up in court.

It’s usually more instructive to judge someone by their actions rather than their words, and the Obama administration is no different.  The administration has now locked up half – more than 11 million acres – of the NPR-A, an area explicitly reserved for energy production.  The administration is “revising” the management plan for the Arctic coastal plain; most interpret that as a plan to lock the area up as wilderness after the election, even though Congress has repeatedly rejected bills seeking the same. The administration is also rewriting its rules for offshore exploration in Alaska and subsequently delaying efforts to return to an area that was safely explored and successfully drilled more than 20 years ago. 

President Obama is not pursuing an “all of the above” strategy in Alaska.  Instead, his administration’s restrictions are now inducing levels of economic anxiety in local residents that the New York Times has deemed worthy of the national spotlight.  We appreciate the coverage, but what we’d really like is a president and a Senate that will work with us to solve the problem – by producing more of Alaska’s energy. 

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10-12-14

12 October 2014 12:11pm

Governor Sean Parnell, Gas Pipeline, Sb 138, SB 21, AGIA, Dave Harbour photoIn an Alaska Dispatch interview, Governor Sean Parnell (NGP Photo) said, "With the passage of SB 138 earlier this year, we are taking steps toward construction of a natural gas pipeline.

"Federal applications have been submitted, and my administration is now working with potential buyers in Japan. My administration continues to identify various financing mechanisms for the state's portion of this project; thanks to our solid credit rating, we have options."  Read more here.

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10-11-14 "Can You Trust The US?"

11 October 2014 5:48am

WSJ Opinion: Can You Trust The US?

Our Saturday Commentary:

Americans cannot trust the US Administration (e.g. Alaska and Lower 48 Federal Land Restrictions and Poor Energy Policies, Eric Holder Malfeasance; Misapplication of ESA, CWA, CAA; IRS; NSA; VA; AP; EPA; Benghazi; Ebola; Sickening Open Border Policy; Prisoner Trade: One Traitor for Several Terrorists; Fast and Furious; Obamacare Lies; US Marine Rotting In Mexican Jail; Cowardly 'Red Line' Syrian Policy, Unsustainable National Debt, Emasculation of Military Strength, Pro-Muslim bias, Anti-Israel bias, Failure To Save America's ISIS-slaughtered Kurdish allies, Alliance With Senate Democrats To Kill All Pro-Job, Pro-Economy House Bills, etc.).  

It's not only Americans.  The U.S. and Canada are each others' largest trading partners.  A big difference between the two countries now is that Canada has a decisive leader in Prime Minister Stephen Harper.  The U.S. has a weak, inexperienced, indecisive, incompetent, socialist leader focused only on transforming the successful democratic model which was the United States.  The cost to American jobs and the U.S. economy by the White House refusal to approve TransCanada's Keystone XL Pipeline is huge.  

Part of the cost is the cost in loss of trust.  Since Canada cannot trust its historical, best trading partner, its Prime Minister has no choice but to explore other markets for Canada's products and natural resources -- including Oil Sands oil.  Our compliments to Harper for his insight, initiative, wisdom and courage.

Shame on America's elected chief executive for ruining America in so many ways.  Let me count the ways, which since 2012, have multiplied....   -dh

 

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10-10-14 "Interesting Moments" From Our Video Archives - Alaska's Congressional Delegation Unites On LNG

10 October 2014 6:06am

Alaska Delegation Unites to Urge DOE Approval of Alaska LNG Export Application


We continue to have high respect for Prime Minister Harper!


This Week's Petroleum News Bakken - Petroleum News


The Alliance's Rebecca Logan writes, "Great presentation yesterday morning by Greg Lalicker from Hilcorp!   Over 200 folks in attendance!!"  We are pleased to attach that presentation for your review.  -dh


We know two Members of Mark Begich, Alaska, US Senator, Dave Harbour Photo, President Obama, Executive Order, Monuments, due process, lawless, rule of lawAlaska's Congressional Delegation who oppose President Obama's irresponsible use of Executive Orders and EPA's preemptive blockage of projects which destroys the concept of "due process" and "Rule of Law".

Here, the President has, by fiat, created the "San Gabriel National Monument", without public input.  We would hope that our Democrat Senator, Mark Begich (NGP Photo), could prevail on the President -- along with his Republican colleagues -- to avoid such unilateral actions which we could otherwise see repeated before 2016 in Alaska and other resource rich states.  -dh


Senate Energy Committee Communications Guru Robert Dillon writes us that, "The Wall Street Journal opinion page yesterday took the Obama administration to the woodshed for failing to take advantage of the historic opportunity to improve our security and economy by strengthening energy ties with Canada and Mexico." 

In a violent, disordered world, the disagreements among the U.S., Canada and Mexico are minor. The benefits of uniting the economies of these three huge, peaceful nations are real. But it will require a U.S. presidential candidate with some of Prime Minister Harper’s vision to make it happen.

Amateur Hour Energy Videos For Our Readers and For Our Archives (Along With Hundreds of Thousands of Research Documents, Presentations, Maps, News Items and Editorials: Google Search Our Archives, Upper Right Column.)

In reviewing our "amateur hour" You Tube Channel, we encounter some “Interesting Moments” in Northern Energy history.  Your author recorded these moments, over the years, either 1) to post on his northerngaspipelines.com webpage, or 2) as research for articles, or (3 as requested raw footage for other news/video producers.  These links will become a part of the Northern Gas Pipelines archives.  Other tapes preserved on this channel are more personal in nature or deal with other than energy subjects.  None of our videos pretend to be professionally filmed.  Enjoy!

Warren Buffett Congratulates Governor Sarah Palin (Then, not now....)

Acting Mayor Matt Clayman Dozes On Stage At National Energy Meeting In Anchorage

Governor Walter Hickel Addresses Federal ‘Broken Promises’ (Hosted with permission)

Dave Harbour: Memorial Day Interview Including Energy Policy Issues

Interior Secretary Ken Salazar’s Staff Coordinates Environmental Rally For Media

Bjorn Lomborg Gives Balanced, Global Warming Scientific Perspective

Commissioners Bill Reilly and Fran Ulmer Hearing: Deepwater Horizon

Dave Harbour Presents NARUC/IOGCC Study To Energy Council On Costs Of Maintaining Moratoria Against Energy Development On Federal Lands, Using Federal Modeling Program

Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger Re: Energy and Environment

Senator Ted Stevens Supports LNG Alternative For North Slope Gas

More here:

Here are some other unedited videos on our VIMEO channel:

  • Senator Lisa Murkowski On The Federal “Assault On Alaska”
  • Governor Jay Hammond And Legislature Define ‘Fair Share’ Of Petroleum Revenue
  • Dave Harbour On Value Of Calgary Arctic Gas Symposium

    Alaska Delegation Letter To DOE

     

    Alaska Delegation Urges DOE to Approve Alaska LNG Export Application

    U.S. Sens. Lisa Murkowski, (NGP Photo), Senator Mark Begich (NGP Photo) and Congressman Don Young, R-Alaska, last week called on the Department of Energy to expeditiously approve a liquefied natural gas (LNG) export license to ensure Alaska’s stranded natural gas resources reach market.

    In a letter sent to Director of the Division of Natural Gas Regulatory Activities John Anderson, the delegation detailed the Alaska LNG Project’s plans to export LNG to both free-trade agreement (FTA) and non-free trade Agreement (non-FTA) countries, as well as its importance to the state’s future.

    “The Alaska LNG Project would be the largest integrated natural gas, LNG project of its kind ever designed and constructed, with an estimated cost of $45 billion to $65 billion,” the delegation wrote. “No other single project is as important to Alaska’s economic future as this massive infrastructure project.”

    The developers of the Alaska LNG Project – Exxon Mobil, ConocoPhillips, BP, and the pipeline company TransCanada – are seeking a license to export 2.5 billion cubic feet of natural gas a day for 30 years. To date, the largest volume of LNG approved for export by DOE was 2.2 Bcf a day for the Sabine Pass project in Louisiana. DOE has also typically approved licenses for 20 years.

    “This is an important project for the future of the state’s economy and it’s important that DOE officials move quickly to approve it as they have all other export projects from Alaska,” Murkowski said. “I’m committed to doing everything I can at the federal level to push it across the finish line.”

    “This is another good step get this critical project moving, and I am glad to stand together with the rest of the delegation,” said Begich. “This natural gas project is good for Alaska’s economy and will create jobs, not to mention the Alaska LNG Project would provide Alaskans significant state revenue, thousands of high-paying construction and operational jobs, and access to low-cost energy.”

    “The Alaska LNG Project is a long time coming, and I’m pleased that a united congressional delegation is working to remove federal barriers to bring our tremendous natural gas resources to market,” said Young. “Projects such as this will encourage Alaska’s prosperity by ensuring well-paying jobs for our citizens and added revenue for our state, all while continuing Alaska’s role in meeting the energy needs of the 21st Century.”

    The delegation pointed out that DOE has previously acknowledged that treatment of LNG export applications in Alaska will necessarily differ from lower 48 applications, and that a presidential finding from 1988 stating that exports of LNG from Alaska “will not diminish the total quantity or quality nor increase the total price of energy available to the United States” is valid and applicable to the Alaska LNG Project application.

    “We believe that the export authorization sought by the Alaska LNG Project is fully consistent with both the public interest of Alaska and the nation,” the delegation wrote. “As the Alaska Congressional Delegation, we write to request that you approve this application expeditiously.”

    SEE THE 9-30-14 LETTER .PDF HERE....


     

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